Sympathy: Transformations and Functions between 1600 and 1800

This project, based at Humboldt University of Berlin, aims to chart the transformations of sympathy in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English literature and culture, starting with its matrix patterns as formulated in classical antiquity. The project set out with a strong emphasis on Neoplatonism, addressing its various rephrasings and in particular its Early Modern interactions (including the Cambridge Platonists) with other philosophies and mentalities such as Epicureanism and Naturalism.  the interrelations between the competing world-views of Neoplatonism and Stoicism and their mutual modifications. In this process, sympathy emerges as a key concept. See attachment for further informations. SympathySFB-Logo

Science and Religion. An exhibition at Christ’s College Cambridge featuring Henry More.

The debate between science and religion is one of the most fascinating and enduring themes of the modern world.

In that debate – sometimes hostile, often harmonious, always complex – Christ’s College has played a significant role.

Whether one looks to the Neoplatonist thinker Henry More (1614-1687), or to William Paley (1743-1805) and his divine ‘watchmaker’, or to Charles Darwin (1809-1882) and his revolutionary theory of evolution, or to the theologian and naturalist Charles Raven (1885-1964), the relationship between scientific understanding and religious belief has exercised some of Christ’s College’s greatest minds.

In a new exhibition held in the stunning period setting of the Old Library, the crucial contribution that these men, and others, have made to this ongoing debate is explored via the College’s rich and diverse collections of printed books, manuscripts and photographs.
For more information visit

The exhibition will be on display from 5 December 2014 until 29 May 2015.

Christ’s science and religion posterChrist’s science and religion poster